Sewing Hacks – Part One

If you are like a lot of people, then you have just been using your best sewing machine for simple projects. Just for things like doing seams or stitching a hole. Which is fine of course, but you are really limiting the power of your machine. Perhaps you have been doing things this way because you aren’t sure if you can handle bigger jobs. Well, if that is the case, then I am going to show you some sewing hacks that will make those big scary projects look like child’s play. So if you are ready, then let’s begin.

Sewing Bulky Material

If you have ever been frustrated trying to sew bumpy fabric such as terry cloth, then take heart. I have a trick that will keep your presser foot moving forward at warp speed. All you have to do is place a plastic bag over the material. The sewing machine will sew right through it and you can keep the machine moving forward on a nice smooth surface.

Sewing In A Zipper

Sewing a zipper is often something dreaded by most people. That doesn’t have to be the case. You can install a zipper the easy way. Sew up your seam, put your zipper face down in the seam allowance and stitch it right in place. Now slice open the seam with your seam ripper and reveal the zipper. Voila!!

The Sure Fire Way To Sew With Metallic Thread

Having problems with that delicate decorative thread? Does it keep breaking as you are trying to sew? Well, if it does, then you can use this trick to fix it. Just use a roll of normal thread with your metallic thread.  Thread them both through the eye and the normal thread will act as a support for the decorative thread.

Storing Bobbins

Are You looking for a better way to store your bobbins? Then why not use a toe separator. They will hold several bobbins securely in place and right at arms length.

Easy Way To Mark Your Seam Allowance

If you want to add a seam allowance to your project but don’t want to do a lot of measuring, then just use pencils to draw it. If you have a 5/8” seam, then tape three pencils together. If you have a 1/2” seam, then tape two pencils together. Then as you trace the edge of your pattern, you will get a perfect seam allowance each time.

Hopefully these sewing hacks will get you started on some of those tougher projects. I have gathered these tips and tricks together by pouring through countless sewing machine reviews and noting some of the best advice found in them. I have found these hacks to be very useful to me and I hope they will be useful to you as well.

Let’s Practice Some Sewing Stitches

The only way that you are going to get better at using your sewing machine is by doing a lot of practice, and I do mean a lot of it. Sure, when you start using it for the first time you are going to make a lot of mistakes, and probably mess up quite a bit of fabric, but it doesn’t mean that it isn’t worth the effort. In fact, you will realize that you the more time you put into it the better you become. As with anything worth doing in this life.

Today, I am going to tell you how to perform some of the most commonly asked for stitches that I have seen people ask for in numerous sewing machine reviews and articles. These are the basic ones that will get you started on your goal of becoming the sewing machine master that you want to become. Some of them might seem hard at first, but don’t be discouraged. Perseverance goes a long way in sewing.

The Handy Back Stitch

This stitch is necessary so that you don’t have to spend time tying the front and back ends of your stitch. It’s also fairly easy to do. You simply sew a few stitches forward, and then when you are ready, push the back switch button. The needle will now begin to travel backwards. When you have reached the beginning of your stitch, stop. Keep practicing until you have it mastered.

Dreaded Straight Lines

Sometimes it can be pretty hard to sew a straight line, so a little bit of practice is recommended. When I first began sewing, I found that if I took a piece of fabric that already straight stitch lines, and practiced following them, that I was able to improve the straightness of my lines. I know that it will work for you as well.

Of course, this isn’t the only way to practice sewing straight lines. You can also take a piece of fabric that is striped (like a dish towel) and practice following the lines. Or you can take a ruler and draw some straight lines on a piece of scrap fabric using a market. Then all you have to do is try to follow the line. Don’t worry if it doesn’t work well the first couple of times you try it. You will get better.

On To Advanced Stitching

Now that you have mastered the basics, it is time to move on to something a little bit harder: curved lines. This type of stitching will often give the most anxiety to beginners, but it isn’t as hard as you think it is. You have to sew a little bit slower and use a steady hand, but it’s well worth the trouble.

Well, these are the best sewing machine practice guidelines that I can give you today. Hopefully, these will not only show you how to start practicing your stitches but will also encourage you to start practicing as well.

Getting To Know Your Sewing Machine

If there is one thing that I have learned from reading hundreds upon hundreds of sewing machine reviews, it’s the fact that many beginners don’t know they have to get used to their machines. Most people don’t realize that each sewing machine seems to have its own unique personality, kind of like a pet. It doesn’t matter if it is a brand new state-of-the-art machine that was bought online or if it is an older one that was bought in a thrift store or at a garage sale. If you want to get the most out of your machine, then you really have to get to know its tendencies. It’s really worth the time to get to know your machine—whether its new or just new to you—so that you can get the most out of it.

That is why I am going to give you some tips that will help you familiarize yourself with your sewing machine without all of the headaches involved with such a learning curve. It doesn’t matter if you are a novice or if you are the best sewing machine master on the planet acquainting yourself to a new machine. These tips are going to help you get up and running in a shorter amount of time and without all of the aggravation, trust me.

The Manual

The first step in this process is locating the manual to your sewing machine. Every single machine on the planet has a manual that shows you how to properly operate it. The manual is an important part of the machine and tells you everything you need to know about it. It tells you how to properly use it and how to maintain it. Therefore, it’s very important that you familiarize yourself with it. Of course, if you bought your machine second-hand, then it may not have come with the manual. That’s okay, because you can find the manuals to almost all but the most exotic brands online, and they are usually offered free of charge by the manufacturer as well.

The Bobbins

You may have several bobbins around your house that have been leftover from the machines you’ve previously owned and you might be tempted to re-purpose them for your new machine. I’m sorry but that is not a good idea. Most manufacturers have bobbins that are unique to their machines. Even if they appear to fit, then they might not be right for your model. And that is why I recommend that you get ones that are made specifically for your machine.

Practice Repeatedly

The last piece of advice I can give you that will help you get to know your machine a little better is to practice and practice again. Start off by practicing on scrap pieces of cloth. This will give you a good idea of your machine’s tendencies and help you concentrate on controlling its speed and settings. After you have done that, then you can move on to trying to sew simple patterns and eventually move on to putting the machine into full service.

The Greatest Sewing Tips Of All Time

I know that everyone says that they have the best sewing machine tips, and I am sure that is true to some extent. The tips that work for you always seem like they are the best tips in the world. Which is why I am going to refrain from displaying too much bravado about the tips I am going to present to you today. Some of these tips you will most likely use—thereby making them the best tricks in the world—but others you may already know of, so you’ll most likely toss those to the wayside. That is fine with me. Pick and choose the ones that work for you. The point of this article is to help as many people as possible with their sewing.

Keep The Thread Guide Raised

When you sit down to sew, make sure that your thread guide is in its most raised position. If it isn’t, then when you begin the needle will become unthreaded. Make this a regular habit and you eventually you will check it every single time.

Keep Your Needle Down

Another thing that should become a habit is keeping your needle down whenever you stop to do something else. A lot of people will raise the needle whenever the stop to put pins in the garment. Learning to pivot the needle while it is still in the fabric will allow you keep your seams aligned perfectly.

Start By Hand

A great tip is to always start the first couple of stitches by using your hand-wheel. This will allow you to make sure that not only is the needle entering the fabric smoothly (which can be a plus if you are sewing heavy or bulky fabrics) but will also allow you to avoid time consuming thread jams.

Retread On A Rethread

One minute you are stitching along and the next minute you are looking at a thread that is either too loose or too tight. If that is the case, then you should rethread the entire machine. The spool, bobbin and everything else. This will usually solve the problem and prevent you from wasting a lot of time going through a check list of possible problems.

Don’t Use Universal Needles

Universal needles may be good for basic projects, but they aren’t good for much anything else. If you can, then you should get a needle that is specific to the type of material that you are sewing. Cottons and calicos often use a smaller needle, while denim needs a bigger needle. Use the right needle for the job and you will end up with a better looking project.

Do Your Research

If you are considering buying a new sewing machine, then make sure you put in your due-diligence. Check out sewing machine reviews, talk to friends and check out features. A sewing machine is an investment that should last you a long time and make your work easier. Be sure that it does both of those things.

The Most Common Errors While Using A Sewing Machine – Part Two

In my last article, I attempted to take on some of the most common problems that people complain about in sewing machine reviews and give a solution to these problems. Once I finished however, I realized that I had missed quite a few common problems, so I have decided to do a second part to my original article and attempt to address them today. Here are the most common sewing machine problems and their solutions, part two. Enjoy.

Problem #4: My Machine Punches Holes In My Fabric

If you are attempting to sew and your machine is trying to make Swiss cheese out of your fabric, then you are most likely using the wrong needle. Needle choice is the absolute most important choice you can make. And torn up clothing isn’t the only problem with using the wrong needle. If you have the wrong needle inserted into your machine, then you can have a wide array of problems. You can mess up the timing on your machine, throw a bobbin or damage your bobbin hook. That is why it is absolutely necessary to choose the right needle for the machine, the stitch you are doing and the fabric you are stitching.

Problem #5: My Stitches Are Too Tight

If you are sewing and notice that your stitches are a little too tight on the top, then you have a problem that needs to be addressed immediately. Sometimes this problem arises because the tension isn’t correctly set on the machine, but that isn’t always the case. Sometimes it’s a mistake you made while threading the machine.

When you wind the bobbin, you often place the end of the thread on the tension disks—which is standard practice. However, you also have to make sure that you remove it before you start sewing. If you don’t, then you often end up with a stitch that is way too tight. And that is no good for anyone.

Problem #6: My Thread Keeps Knotting

If your thread keeps knotting and are creating problems with your garment or jamming up your machine, then you might have a problem with one or more parts of your machine. First, you want to make sure that your thread is sticking out of the back of your sewing machine. Second, start your sewing a little further from the edge. If there isn’t enough fabric when you start, then it can cause the thread to knot up. Don’t worry though, you can always backtrack to give take your stitches all the way to the edge. Just be sure that you don’t go over the edge and then try to back track because that will also knot up your threading. Be vigilant and you should be alright.

And that concludes my article on the best sewing machine solutions for the most common problems. If I think of any more, then I will be sure to write another article, but I do think that this two part articles covers most of the primary ones.

How To Clean Your Sewing Machine – Part Two

Now that you know that you have to clean your machine, understand the reason behind most negative sewing machine reviews is poor maintenance, and have assemble your cleaning tools—it is now time to dig right in and begin cleaning your device. Before we start I would like to remind you that you are going to need a good hour to follow these steps, so be sure that you have the time set aside for this project so that you aren’t interrupted in the middle of it. With that being said, let’s dig right in and start getting our sewing machine in tip-top condition. Here are the steps in order:

  1. Unplug your machine. This is something you should do whenever you are cleaning the machine or even when you are just changing the needles. It is just good safety.
  2. Remove the needle from your machine and toss it. As you do so, be sure to note the direction of the flat side of the needle. In most machines with side bobbins, the flat side usually faces the right. If you don’t have a machine with a side bobbin, then the flat side of the needle will most likely face the back of the machine.
  3. Read your manual and find out how to remove the needle plate and the presser bar. Remove them.
  4. Next open the bobbin cover and remove the bobbin as well as the bobbin case.
  5. Using your lint brush or makeup brush, remove all of the debris from around these parts.
  6. If you are familiar with how the bobbin race fits into the machine, then you can remove it and clean it. If you aren’t familiar with how this part fits into the machine or your manual doesn’t give you specific directions on removing it, then its best to not remove this part in the first place for cleaning. Take it to a sewing machine repair shop for cleaning. On the other hand, if you can safely remove it, then be sure to give it a thorough cleaning.
  7. Brush out the feed dogs
  8. Brush out the area beneath the feed dogs
  9. Reassemble the bobbin race (if you took it apart that is)
  10. If there is a side cover on your sewing machine, then you can open it up and clean the thread path and tension disks.
  11. Take your soft cloth and clean the exterior of the machine.
  12. Reassemble everything, plug it in and make sure it is working correctly. After you have determined it is working, then you can unplug it and insert new needles in it.

This is the best sewing machine cleaning method I know about. I have been using this method to clean all of my machines and they have never failed me during a stitching job. Follow these steps on a regular basis and I am sure your machine will run just as good as the day you bought it.

Learning The Basic Parts Of A Sewing Machine

This article is for those who are inexperience using sewing machines. It is intended for novices who have basically no knowledge of these devices but want to begin to learn about them. Which means that if you have intermediate or advanced sewing machine knowledge, then you are probably going to be quite bored with it. That’s because today we are learning about the parts of a sewing machine.

Some of you might scoff at the idea that someone needs to be taught the basic parts of a sewing machine, but let me tell you that it isn’t funny at all. This is the kind of knowledge that one needs as they are beginning to use this machine and judging from sewing machine reviews, is a topic that really needs to be addressed. So without further adieu, let’s begin with basic sewing machine anatomy.

The Power Switch

One of the most important parts of a sewing machine, as well as one of the parts that is most frequently used, is the power switch. This turns the device on and off and is located in different places on different models. Usually on the top or the back of the machine.

The Spool Pin

After finding the power switch, you can now look for the spool pin. This is a small pin that is designed to hold your spool of thread. It is usually located on the top of the machine and is made of plastic or metal.

The Bobbin Winder And Bobbin Winder Stopper

Located next to the spool pin is the bobbin winder. It’s a small horizontal wheel that is used to wind thread onto your bobbin. Next to that is a small pin called a bobbin winder stopper.

The Thread Guide

This is a small funny shaped guide with a simple purpose. It’s designed to guide thread from the spool to the bobbin winder.

Stitch Adjustment Buttons

This may be manual buttons or switches or an electronic one, depending on your sewing machine model. However, no matter which one it is, the point of it is the same. To select the length, type and direction of the stitch.

Take-Up Lever

This is the part that moves vertically as you stitch.

Tension Dial

This is a wheel with numbers on it. It is usually located near the take-up lever.

Needle Clamp Screw

Located under the arm of the machine. Its used to hold the needle in place while you are sewing.

Presser Foot

This is under the needle clamp screw. This holds your fabric or material in place.

Needle Plate

This is the plate underneath the needle.

The Feed Dog

Located under the presser foot and on the needle plate. It’s a guide that feeds the fabric while you are sewing.

Bobbin Cover Release

These is the last part on the machine.  It releases the cover so that you can access the bobbin and insert or remove it.

And that is all there is to it. This may not be the best sewing machine anatomy lesson, but it is one that will allow you to learn your machine quickly and easily.

The Art Of Needles And Tension

I’ve had my sewing machine for almost two decades now. It was a present given to me by my Aunt Betty for my 19th birthday. When I first received it, I didn’t sew avidly and really didn’t think much of my aunt’s present. However, after I saw a lady on television sewing a tote topper, I decided to give it a try and immediately became hooked. From that point forward, I sewed everything I could get my hands on and used the machine almost all of the time.

I still have that machine and pretty much use it on a daily basis. I became really good at using it and have even contributed to several sewing machine reviews about this particular machine. I thought I had become pretty much an expert and could sew just about anything. However, I wasn’t always as well-versed in sewing machines as I am now. There was a bit of a learning curve, but the machine was pretty much trouble-free.

Now, that doesn’t mean that I haven’t had any problems with it at all. Actually, if I am going to be honest here, I think that I have had problems with the thread tangling or the needle breaking over the entire course of the eighteen years that I have been using it. But I thought it was just a part of sewing and had nothing to do with my ever-developing abilities. I couldn’t have been more wrong.

One day, I decided to take it to the best sewing machine shop I could find to see why I continued to have so many problems with it, and what the shop owner told me was an eye-opener. She told me that there was nothing wrong with the machine and that I just wasn’t operating it properly. She then proceeded to show me a few tips. After that, I haven’t had a single problem with needles breaking or the thread tangling.

These tips really has saved me a lot of frustration and that is why I have decided to share them with you today. After all, I figured I couldn’t be the only person on the planet that might need a little bit of a lesson on stitch length or properly using needles. I am sure that there are a lot of people who could use this sage advice. Of course, I am sure that veteran seamstresses will probably be bored senseless by the tips I am going to give here today, but I hope that all of the rest of you will learn something new today.

The first thing that I was taught was that I was using the wrong needles. I was using a Singer machine but was using a Brother sewing needle. That was the most obvious of my problems but it wasn’t the only one. I also had the wrong tension on the machine. The lady at the shop told me that once I had the tension set on my machine correctly, there usually wasn’t a reason to change it. She advised me to adjust the tension so that the stitches above and the ones below were of equal length. These two pieces of advice really helped me and I hope they help you out too.

Saving Time With Your Stitch

There are times when you want to stitch a garment or piece of fabric with all the care in the world. You really want to take your time and make sure that you every single inch of it is done to perfection. If that is the case, then there are about a million articles that will help you on your journey to perfection. In fact, I have even written a few of them myself. However, this is not one of them.

Today, we are going to concentrate on how to sew quickly. Look, not all of us have time to put in that perfect cross-stitch or make sure that our seams are flawless. Sometimes we just need to mend an article of clothing, get it out the door and be done with it. All of us have busy lives, a fact that is proven by the many comments made in sewing machine reviews. We just need to get our chores done as quickly as possible.

Here are a few tips that will help you get that sewing job done quickly without creating a total mess out of it. If you follow these steps, then you might not have the absolute perfect piece of stitch work done, but you will have it completed in no time flat.

No Pressing

Sewing 101 pretty much says that you need to press a seam before you stitch them. Which is usually what I recommend. Unfortunately however, that eats up a lot of time. So let’s do it without pressing. Just pull the fabric taught—on either side of the seam—and do it.

Quick Pressing

Okay, you just can’t seem to give up the habit of pressing. It is something that is ingrained into your very DNA, I understand. You don’t want to forgo pressing in order to get your sewing done faster. If that is the case, then I have a solution for you. It’s called a quick press.

If you have a number of articles to stitch a seam into, then you might want to press them all at once. This is a lot more efficient way of doing this task then pressing, stitching, pressing, rinse and repeat. Just knock it all out at once and get on with your life.

Don’t Use Pins

Don’t have time to pin your seams before you stitch them? Then don’t. Match up the initial part of the seams and bring the fabric in as you go. Just be sure that you keep the needle down the whole time—especially when readjusting the seam—to hold the fabric in place and keep everything nice and tidy.

The Chain Stitch

A quick way to stitch multiple pieces of fabric is to chain stitch them. This technique allows you to get your sewing done without all of that stopping and starting. Once you’ve finished one seam, you feed another one in and keep working. This technique is one of the best sewing machine techniques I have ever used and works like a charm. Try it, I am sure you’ll like it.

Using Your Sewing Machine For Buttons

A question that is posed to me on a regular basis – as well as being posed in numerous online sewing machine reviews, is how to sew on buttons. For some people, stitching on buttons is one of the easiest things in the world, but for others it is a project that is fraught with a lot of frustration and heartache. Today, I am going to tackle this subject and tell you how you can sew on buttons like a seasoned pro.

One of the very last things a person does when they are finishing up their sewing is to put on buttons. It seems like they are the perfect accent to any garment job. However, it is also one that causes the most headaches. Many people find them to be tedious, time consuming and a general pain in the you-know-what. This is because is can be very hard to make them look uniform. At least, that is what it seems like.

In reality, sewing on buttons is as simple of a task as anything else done with your sewing machine. You just have to take your time and follow the best sewing machine button method. A time-honored one that will assure that your buttons not only look professional but don’t give you a bunch of gray hairs stitching them on. Here is the method:

Before you start you are going to have the right equipment. The first thing that you’ll need is a sewing machine that is capable of doing zig zag stitches. The next thing you’ll want to have is a little device that attaches to your machine called a button sewing foot. You can still sew on a button without this device, but I personally recommend that you don’t. This attachment has saved me a ton of aggravation.

Of course, if you don’t have a button sewing foot – or are adamant about not purchasing one – then you can do it the hard way. You can remove the presser foot and hold down the button using only the ankle of the sewing machine.

After getting your equipment together, it is now time to place the button. Figure out where you want it on the garment and tape it down securely with a piece of scotch-tape. Don’t worry, your machine will stitch right through the tape and when you are done it will peel off effortlessly.

Now lower your feed dogs. If your machine has a button setting, then choose that and the feed dogs will be lowered automatically. Attach your button sewing foot (if you are using one) and then select your stitch. If your machine has a button stitching setting, then it will select the stitch for you. If not, then just choose a zig zag stitch with a stitch length of zero.

Hand crank the machine so the needle goes through the left button hole. Do the same on the right hole. Ensure that the needle hits the center of each hole. Once you have done that, you are now ready to begin stitching.

Stitch approximately 9 stitches – very slowly. Now raise the presser foot and remove the fabric with the button on it. Snip the top and bottom threads, leaving about 4-5 inches of thread hanging from both. Wrap these “tails” of thread around the bottom portion of the stitches. Underneath the button but still on top of the fabric. Take a hand needles and insert the tails through the fabric and tie them into a knot. Trim as necessary. Congratulations, you have now sewn on a button!